October 10, 2020

Vaccinations to Travel in South America

By master

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Summary of vaccination recommendations:
All travelers should visit either their personal physician or a travel health clinic 4-8 weeks before departure.
Vaccinations (Please be sure and check with your personal physician or a travel health clinic for a complete list of needed vaccinations):

Hepatitis A Recommended for all travelers
Typhoid For travelers who may eat or drink outside major restaurants and hotels
Yellow fever Recommended for provinces east of the Andes Mountains less than 2300 m in elevation.
Hepatitis B Recommended for all travelers
Rabies For travelers spending a lot of time outdoors, or at high risk for animal bites, or involved in any activities that might bring them into direct contact with bats
Measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) Two doses recommended for all travelers born after 1956, if not previously given
Tetanus-diphtheria Revaccination recommended every 10 years

Medications (Please be sure and check with your personal physician or a travel health clinic for a complete list of needed medications):

 Doxycycline is recommended for all areas except the cities of Guayaquil and Quito, the central highland tourist areas, the Galapagos Islands, and altitudes greater than 1500 m (4921 ft).

Travelers’ diarrhea is the most common travel-related ailment. The cornerstone of prevention is food and water precautions, as outlined below. All travelers should bring along an antibiotic and an antidiarrheal drug to be started promptly if significant diarrhea occurs, defined as three or more loose stools in an 8-hour period or five or more loose stools in a 24-hour period, especially if associated with nausea, vomiting, cramps, fever or blood in the stool. A quinolone antibiotic is usually prescribed: either ciprofloxacin (Cipro)(PDF) 500 mg twice daily or levofloxacin (Levaquin) (PDF) 500 mg once daily for a total of three days. Quinolones are generally well-tolerated, but occasionally cause sun sensitivity and should not be given to children, pregnant women, or anyone with a history of quinolone allergy. Alternative regimens include a three day course of rifaximin (Xifaxan) 200 mg three times daily or azithromycin (Zithromax) 500 mg once daily. Rifaximin should not be used by those with fever or bloody stools and is not approved for pregnant women or those under age 12. Azithromycin should be avoided in those allergic to erythromycin or related antibiotics. An antidiarrheal drug such as loperamide (Imodium) or diphenoxylate (Lomotil) should be taken as needed to slow the frequency of stools, but not enough to stop the bowel movements completely. Diphenoxylate (Lomotil) and loperamide (Imodium) should not be given to children under age two.

Insect protection measures are essential.

Altitude sickness may occur in travelers flying to Quito, which is almost 3000 meters above sea level. Acetazolamide is the drug of choice to prevent altitude sickness. The usual dosage is 125 or 250 mg twice daily starting 24 hours before ascent and continuing for 48 hours after arrival at altitude. Possible side-effects include increased urinary volume, numbness, tingling, nausea, drowsiness, myopia and temporary impotence. Acetazolamide should not be given to pregnant women or those with a history of sulfa allergy. For those who cannot tolerate acetazolamide, the preferred alternative is dexamethasone 4 mg taken four times daily. Unlike acetazolamide, dexamethasone must be tapered gradually upon arrival at altitude, since there is a risk that altitude sickness will occur as the dosage is reduced.

Travel to high altitudes is generally not recommended for those with a history of heart disease, lung disease, or sickle cell disease.

As you like our travel post, we invite you to learn more about these topics and other sites of Ecuador, Gal√°pagos, Colombia & Peru, with one of travel specialist that will help you to create your next travel experience.  Our email : info@guidecuador.com

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